The Glauders Block is older than Pemberton!

 

The Glauders Block was part of the very first settlement (“Big Brook”  as it was known) in the district even before Manjimup & Pemberton townsites.

The settlement was nestled on the banks of the Lefroy Brook at the end of our driveway on Glauders Road and next to Glauders Bridge.  There were many buildings, large sheds and a school house of which only the foundations and 3 old Walnut Trees remain.

The ruins of a Blacksmith shed still remain on our property at the end of the driveway and is the only visible evidence of the “Big Brook” settlement.  When the saw mill was built further upstream the settlement moved to that location now known as Pemberton.

Joe Glauder's family, after whom the road was named, were among the first settlers around 1908.  They chose the site at the junction of the two rivers (Lefroy Brook & Warren River) where there was abundant, beautiful, fresh water and rich Karri loan soil.

Among others, the very prominent W.A. Michelides family settled on the opposite bank of the Lefroy, upstream towards the Cascades waterfall.  They had a large tobacco plantation and grew their very lucrative crop for the booming world market.  They built a number of drying sheds and a small house, the ruins of which still remain today. Later, a railway line was built to carry logs to the mill and the remains of a siding across the bridge still remain, as does the large timber bridge over the Warren River which now carries the very popular tourist tram operating out of Pemberton. Its horn can be heard twice a day as it makes its way along the old track.

The local prominent Drake family bought the property from Joe Glauder and continued farming the property for many years.  They built a water wheel to provide water for the farm and part of the floodway can be seen today.

When the Hewitt family bought the property in 1997 the house was derelict, white ant ridden and rotting away.  The locals thought the new-comers were crazy when they set about rebuilding the house. They added extra bedrooms and two bathrooms which were in keeping with the architectural style.  A new farmhouse kitchen was added with all mod-cons such as a dishwasher, electric oven & hot plates. In addition, air-conditioning and an entertainment system were added to the lounge.  (The rebuilding process can be viewed in a photo album left out for guests.)

Accommodation now includes 3 bedrooms consisting of two Queen size beds (one with an ensuite) and a bunkroom with a double bed up a ladder and two single beds, which share a bathroom with the second bedroom.  The roomy kitchen, dining, lounge area has the modern farmhouse-style kitchen, farmhouse dining table for 8 guests and a comfortable lounge area with log fire, flat screen TV and entertainment system.

In late 2015 an extension was carried out to include a large covered alfresco kitchen and dining area with electric blinds to keep out unwanted dinner guests.  A north facing, cosy sun room/conservatory was also added with partial glass roof and bi-fold doors opening out onto a new deck which itself flows out onto a protected north facing lawn area in a magnificent landscaped garden setting. Comfortable leather lounges, a log fire and a large Smart Flat TV with soundbar and bluetooth connectivity were added to this lovely room.

A spa has been installed into the decking in the garden setting, and an outdoor shower completes the picture.

The old oak tree at the front of the house is the only part of the original garden left. The rest of the extensive gardens were planted by the Hewitt family which not only provide an ideal landscaped habitat for our abundant resident local bird population but guests are invited to sample its produce in season.

Today farming activities are limited to the very friendly cattle and their calves grazing on the magnificent rolling pastures, together with the local kangaroo and emu population.  The bird life around the cottage garden is nothing short of spectacular, featuring beautiful wrens, robins, cheeky willy wagtails and many other visiting birds.